Forging of stone working tools

A. forging a hammer

To do

B1. Forging a chisel for stone working

forging a chisel for natural stone

  • Step 1: A summerhouse piece of steel (length approx. 6 3/8 inch / 16.2 cm, diameter approximately 5/8 inch / 1.58 cm) cut off. An end to straw-yellow heat, then tapered round off to a final diameter of 0.5 cm / 3/16 inch (see fig. 1).
  • The other end pale yellow heat step 2: and from forge in a flat tip as shown in Figure 2. Approximately 1/4 inch of this tip should protrude over the edge of the anvil. The finish can be made to a flatter just above the fresh temperature. If the tip at low temperature is forged, the metal fabric is torn.
  • Step 3: the projecting end "A" is with a shotgun hammer completely or partially cut off. The latter method, the protruding tip is canceled after hardening. So exposed to the metal structure can be observed if the temperature was correct during the hardening process. If the chisel tip was hammered out too thin may they not back are compressed (danger of damage to the metal structure), but the tip must be crushed later.
  • Step 4: who must chisel slowly cooled inner tensions, can be mined it. The cutting edge is a color of blue, blue/red left. Then the cutting edge on a grinding wheel at an angle of 60 ° is sanded.

source: elementary forge practice, Robert H. Harcourt < br > < br > Publisher Stanford University Press, 1917 (S. 113):

[drywall Trockenmauererk forging forging tool of masonry tools dry stone]

C1. Forging a rated rock drill

forging a hand drill for natural stone

  • Step 1: A summerhouse piece of steel (length approx. 40cm / 16 inch diameter 2cm / 3/4 inch) cut. An end to heat, then flat beat to a thickness of about 0.5 cm / 3/16 inch at the top (see fig. 1.1.) Both sides edit and as wide as possible hit.
  • Step 2: the round top with a chisel cut is straight.
  • Step 3: the cutting edge on the ends are processed analog step 2.
  • The cutting edge with a hammer sharpen step 4:

  • , where the cutting edge should be held flat on the anvil. The strokes should be made at an angle of 45 ° to roll back the metal and the drill should be turned slightly during machining to make the cutting round
  • Step 5: after sharpening hardens the drill cutting as with a chisel. The occasion colour should be a dark straw.

source: elementary forge practice, Robert H. Harcourt < br > < br > Publisher Stanford University Press, 1917 (S. 113):

source: Gotthard railway, excerpt from the rules of the Bedingnisheftes over the execution of masonry", 1873

[drywall Trockenmauererk forging forging tool of masonry tools dry stone]

C2. Forging a stone drill with cross cutting

  • Step 1: A summerhouse piece of steel (length approx. 20 inch / 50.8 cm, diameter approximately 3/4 inch / 1.9 cm) cut.
  • Step 2: end of a heat, then this with a flatter on a diameter of approx. 1 1/10 inch / compress 2.8 cm.
  • Step 3: with a lower hammer on 4 sides hammer small grooves. These grooves have a length of 2 1/4 inches / XXcm). You have to keep the function the upper and lower v-shaped die tools.
  • The grooves with the die tools deepen step 4:

  • (fig. C2A). The drill must be turned regularly during this work so that the grooves are equally deep.
  • Step 5: the emerging wing of the cross are now on a "Wing die" / "wing swage" (fig. C2b) from forged with a rectangular are thinner. Will the end of the drill with a very thin "hot chisel" perpendicular crushed down.
  • Step 6: the drill cutting shapes out as shown in Fig. 6.
  • Step 7: the cutting edge on form with a "counterpart" (fig. C2c). This holder is either placed on the anvil and punched the drill or the Overarm is held directly on the drill and beaten with a sledgehammer on the drill. The blade can be sharpened with file, as long as the tool tip is hot.
  • Step 8: the color of the occasion should be a dark straw.

source: elementary forge practice, Robert H. Harcourt < br > < br > Publisher Stanford University Press, 1917:

[drywall Trockenmauererk forging forging tool of masonry tools dry stone]

D. steels for stone tools

source: Handbook of rock excavation: methods and cost, Halbert powers Gillette < br > < br > Publisher M.C.. Clark, 1904 (S. 50):

masonry drill bit drill steel will contain between 0.7 to 1.0% carbon

source: elementary forge practice, Robert H. Harcourt < br > < br > Publisher Stanford University Press, 1917 (S. 113):

0.7 - 0.8% carbon: forging tools such as rivet hammers, sledgehammers, hammers generally, wedges, tools that are welded

0.8 - 0.9% carbon: shear blades, press tools, grains, axes, stone drills, chisels, die forging molds

0.9 - 1.0% carbon: masonry drill, chisel, die molds, shear blades, knives, axes

1.0 - 1.1% carbon: flat tool parts for lathes, small hand tools, knives, axes, drills

1.1 - 1.1% carbon: turning / rotation tools, drills, reamers, granite chisel

1.2 - 1.3% carbon: turning / rotation tools, engraving tools

1.3 - 1.4% carbon: rotary tools, cutting tools

Detection of steels

[drywall Trockenmauererk forging forging tool of masonry tools dry stone]